Hackers break browser SSL/TLS Encryption

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Word has quickly spread that a serious weakness has been discovered in the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol that allows attackers to silently decrypt data that’s passing between a web server and an end-user browser.

All reports indicate that this vulnerability affects the SSL protocol itself and is not specific to any operating system, browser or software/hardware product.  This is an information disclosure vulnerability that allows the decryption of encrypted SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 traffic.  It primarily impacts HTTPS web traffic, since the browser is the primary attack method.

SSL and TLS are two of the industry standard technologies that Ipswitch File Transfer solutions use to encrypt data while in-transit.  Additional technologies such as AES transport encryption, PGP file encryption, and the encrypted FTPS and SFTP protocols are also used to secure data.  As always, we recommend a defense-in-depth approach for protecting sensitive data.

At this point the vulnerability is not considered a high risk.  Ipswitch is closely monitoring the situation closely and will implement recommendations and provide updates if this turns into a serious threat.  We agree with Microsoft’s recommendation to prioritize  the RC4 cipher suite and to enable TLS 1.1 in client and server.  And given the choice, use the unaffected FTPS and SFTP protocols (and not HTTPS) until this vulnerability investigation is complete.  Microsoft has also issued a fix fix that enables support for TLS 1.1 in Internet Explorer on Windows 7 and Windows 2008.

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