Can a file transfer system enable central management and control?

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You might say that the entire point of a Managed File Transfer (MFT) system is to do exactly that: provide centralized management and control. For example, let’s say that your company is subject to the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). Requirement 4 of PCI DSS is to “encrypt transmission of cardholder data and sensitive information across public networks,” such as the Internet. Let’s also say that you frequently need to transmit cardholder data to partner companies, such as vendors who will be fulfilling requests.

One option is to simply allow someone within your company to email that information, or to have an automated process do so. You’ll need to ensure that everyone remembers to encrypt those emails — you did remember to get digital certificates for everyone, correct? — every single time. If someone forgets, you’ve created the potential for a data breach, and it’s not going to look very good for your company on the evening news.

Another option is to automate the file transfer using an MFT solution. That solution can be centrally configured to always apply PGP‐based encryption to the file, to always require an FTP‐over‐SSL connection with the vendors’ FTP servers, and to always require 256‐bit AES encryption. You don’t have to remember those details beyond the initial configuration — it’s
centrally configured. Even if your users need to manually transfer something ad‐hoc — perhaps an additional emergency order during the Christmas rush — your MFT solution will “know the rules” and act accordingly. Your users’ lives become easier, your data stays protected, and everyone sleeps more soundly at night. This central control is often referred to as policy-based configuration because it’s typically configured in one spot and enforced — not just applied — to your entire MFT infrastructure, regardless of how many physical servers and clients you are running.
What’s the difference between enforced and applied? Making a configuration change is applying it. That doesn’t, of course, stop someone else from coming along behind you and applying a new configuration. The idea with policies is that they’re configured sort of on their own, and that they’re protected by a unique set of permissions that govern who can modify them—they’re not just wide‐open to the day‐to‐day administrators who maintain your servers. In many cases, a review/approve workflow may have to be followed to make a change to a policy. Once set, the policies are continually applied to manageable elements such as MFT client software and MFT servers. A server administrator can’t just re-configure a server, because the policy prevents it. The MFT solution ensures that your entire MFT infrastructure stays properly configured all the time.

- From The Tips and Tricks Guide to Managed File Transfer by Don Jones

To read more, check out the full eBook or stay tuned for more file transfer tips and tricks!

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